The 10th Anniversary of the iPad: A Perspective from the Windows Team

A perspective from the Windows team.

It didn’t quite change everything it promised; but people preferred it, and they changed what they did in order to use it. Fully story -> Follow Me.

Testing Business Ideas with David J. Bland

Ideas need to be tested to see what they need to succeed.

David hopes to influence change in funding startups, as he believes that it should be based on evidence rather than emotion. Keep reading here.

Dyson has scrapped its electric car project

Dyson have determined their electric car business model is not commercially viable.

It’s not the first project which has changed direction and it will not be the last. A key aspect to innovation. Keep reading here.

The Top 20 Business Transformations of the Last Decade

In an era of relentless change, a company survives and thrives based on its ability to re-position itself to create a new future.

Innovation is required in both the exploitation of existing business models and the exploration of new ones. Nice 7 minutes read here.

Apple Finally Confronts Its Growth-Starved Reality

Apple is finally displaying a willingness to change its business model.

Smartphone sales have stalled globally and Apple are going wide rather than narrow to continue growing it’s business. Continue reading here.

Entrepreneurs, Then and Now

CEO of Slack, Stewart Butterfield, interviews the a16z co-founders in this special episode of the a16z Podcast to commemorate their 10th anniversary.

Learn what’s changed – not just in tech, but in profiles of entrepreneurs – in the last ten years. Nice podcast – 45 minutes to listen here.

Sears Could’ve Been Amazon, What Happened?

Sears built its original success by being the mail-order Amazon of its day.

This story reminds us that these things can happen so easily without even being visible, and that needs to change! Watch the 6 minutes video here.

How to Adapt and Flow

At age 26, Chip Conley founded Joie de Vivre Hospitality and grew the company into the second largest boutique hotel brand in the United States.

Learn the valuable insights that have allowed him to flourish while shifting roles and accommodating to cultural change. Hey, and this time you can relax and lean back when watching the 45 minutes video here! 🙂

The Most Valuable Company (for Now) Is Having a Nadellaissance

Microsoft have survived an innovator’s dilemma alongside an identity crisis.

Understand and read here (5 minutes read) why you can’t suddenly change who you are without understanding who you are first.

Guest Blog: Driving innovation with L&D

Many companies want to establish a culture of innovation, one that encourages flexibility, creativity and supports risk-taking. The benefit? breakthrough products, a superior customer experience and a nimble response to market challenges.

But what is happening in organisations today, and what can HR do – specifically the L&D (learning and development) function – in not only supporting, but also driving, a culture of innovation? The 2019 US L&D Report highlights some of the latest trends that companies are already applying.

Be flexible

The aim of a HR/L&D team is to adjust to continuous organizational changes without compromising either the speed or quality of talent development strategies. An overly-planned L&D program is less likely to adapt with any changes in business strategy, so don’t be afraid to stray from your schedule and remain flexible when business needs a shift. This also means that for innovation to occur, your program needs to tailor itself to the individualized present (and future) need of employees.

Create a safe space for risks and ideas

Innovation happens when employees feel free to take risks without repercussions. Focusing on employees’ individual strengths has been key to creating a culture of innovation. Focusing on strengths creates trust; it creates a safe space to try something and possibly fail, have a conversation about it, and move forward. For many organizations, innovation is a byproduct of their culture that prioritizes relationship-building and trust between employees and managers over learning hard skills.

Having engaged and committed leaders who can encourage this culture is key. It comes as no surprise that leadership and management skills are in high demand at organizations that are leading the innovation charge.

Hand-in-hand with creating an environment where risks can happen without repercussion, encouraging idea-sharing between colleagues on all levels of the organization will also propel innovation. The takeaway? Create programs that allow employees to cultivate their individual strengths while building relationships with others on the team. Where there’s support, there’s innovation – and trust needs to exist between team members for innovation to flourish.

Experiment (and then recalibrate)

Innovation comes from risk-taking. But since there are so many effective mediums and methods to deliver learning in 2019, it’s important to think outside the box and beyond traditional learning – and to never be afraid of recalibrating based on results. It’s vital to carry out evaluations and continuously monitor feedback in order to produce and develop the most innovation-driving programs.

Evaluation and recalibration are at the heart of world-leading innovation initiatives. Through surveys, focus groups, or other evaluations, it’s crucial to determine which programs work, which can be optimized, and which should be scrapped. Even more critical, however, is that you cultivate a working environment where employees can question current processes without repercussion. In a space where there’s mutual trust, reflection can grow into innovation.

Connect L&D and innovation

You could plan great L&D initiatives and hope that it sparks innovation company-wide, or you could be even more proactive. Planning programming around the concept of innovation might include a speaker series with innovators in your industry, a course on design thinking, or hack-a-thons where employees get to take a step back from their daily duties and focus on what could be improved at the company.

Written and Contributed by findcourses.co.uk // EMG – Education Media Group